Carbon nanotubes make it possible to grow human hearts

Carbon nanotubes make it possible to grow human hearts

www.extremetech.com
New This week, the American Chemical Society's journal Nano printed an article detailing the use of carbon nanotubes in a growth scaffold for rat heart cells. The result? Very possibly the first working model of functional, grown heart cells, and the first step down the long road to complex organs on...
Carbon nanotubes make it possible to grow human hearts
                   

Comments:

Related:

The race to productize graphene heats up, as UK opens new research center

gigaom.com
The UK doesn’t really have an answer to Silicon Valley, but ‘Silicon Fen’ – the area around Cambridge – comes closest out of the various British tech hubs. There’s a lot of interplay between business and academia there, which is why it’s notable that the renowned University of Cambridge is...
The race to productize graphene heats up, as UK opens new research center

Cambridge University To Open Graphene R&D Centre With Backing from Nokia, Plastic Logic & Others, Plus £12M+ U.K. Government Grant

techcrunch.com
Material scientists and nanotechnologists get very excited about the potential of graphene — a one-atom-thick sheet of bonded carbon atoms which is exceptionally strong, lightweight and flexible and is a better conductor than silicon  – but they are not the only ones to see huge potential in it. Nokia, Plastic Logic, Philips,...
Cambridge University To Open Graphene R&D Centre With Backing from Nokia, Plastic Logic & Others, Plus £12M+ U.K. Government Grant

DoE calls for a chemical battery with 5x capacity, within 5 years - can it be done?

www.extremetech.com
The Department of Energy wants batteries with five times the energy storage of those we have today. They want them to be five times cheaper and to be ready in five years. Earlier this year the Department’s solicitation for proposals was announced, and now five universities have been chosen for...
DoE calls for a chemical battery with 5x capacity, within 5 years - can it be done?
Rice University creates graphene/nanotube hybrid material that could redefine electronics and energy storage

3D-printed consumer electronics just became a reality

www.extremetech.com
Embedding sensors and electronics inside of 3D objects in a single build process has been a long sought after goal in 3D printing (3DP). A group led by Simon Leigh, at the University of Warwick in England, has now done just that. Leigh’s group developed a low-cost material they call...
3D-printed consumer electronics just became a reality

Stanford creates touch-sensitive, conductive, infinitely-self-healing synthetic skin

www.extremetech.com
Stanford University material scientists have devised the first synthetic, plastic skin that is conductive, sensitive to touch, and capable of repeatedly self-healing at room temperature. The most immediate applications are in the realm of smart, self-healing prosthetic limbs that are covered in this synthetic skin — but in the long...
Stanford creates touch-sensitive, conductive, infinitely-self-healing synthetic skin

Move Over, Intel: IBM's New Chip Tech Could Change Everything (IBM)

www.businessinsider.com
IBM has put the chip industry on notice by inventing a new technology that would replace silicon with a new material, carbon nanotubes. IBM has found a new way to put what seems like an impossibly large number of transistors into an insanely small area, the width of only a...
Move Over, Intel: IBM's New Chip Tech Could Change Everything (IBM)
IBM researchers claim breakthrough in chip-manufacturing using carbon nanotubes

IBM's next-gen chips may swap silicon for carbon nanotubes

www.pcworld.com
IBM has hit a milestone in its quest to come up with a successor to silicon computer chips. The company said Sunday its research into semiconductors based on carbon nanotubes, or CNTs, has yielded a new method to accurately place them on wafers in large numbers. The technology is...
IBM's next-gen chips may swap silicon for carbon nanotubes
× Just a test of the new info bar. What do you think?