Honeybees trained to sniff out landmines in Croatia
Honeybees trained to sniff out landmines in Croatia
                             

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The Week in Pictures: Google's utopia to a stem cell burger

news.cnet.com
Google CEO Larry Page imagines a tech-driven utopia, robotic bees take flight, and a $325,000 stem cell hamburger is ready to be eaten. [Read more]...
The Week in Pictures: Google's utopia to a stem cell burger

BitTorrent launches 'Bundle' media format with Ultra Music partnership

www.engadget.com
The folks at BitTorrent have been busy little bees since the beginning of 2013. Between Sync, SoShare, Live and Surf you'd think the company already had enough projects to work on. Now it's adding a new file format called Bundle to its lineup of experimental alphas and betas. The...
BitTorrent launches 'Bundle' media format with Ultra Music partnership
Erectile function: bats mop up nectar with "hairy" tongues

We're halfway toward artificially intelligent robotic bees

gigaom.com
Remember those artificially intelligent robotic bees I wrote about in October? Well, it turns out they’re already on a good pace toward being reality: The RoboBees project at Harvard has been flying prototype bees for months, and the next step is equipping them with brains. That the bees, which are...
We're halfway toward artificially intelligent robotic bees

Is That an Insect, or a Drone? Now You'll Never Know Until It's Too Late

betabeat.com
Guess Harvard’s not all cheating at quiz bowl, after all: Scientific American reports that researchers at the Kremlin on the Charles have created the Robobee, the world’s first insect-sized flying robot. It took a decade to get the mechanical critter, which is about the size of a quarter and has independently...
Is That an Insect, or a Drone? Now You'll Never Know Until It's Too Late

Robot bees take first flight

news.cnet.com
Harvard University researchers have conducted the first controlled flight of so-called "RoboBees," which weigh less than a tenth of a gram. [Read more]...
Robot bees take first flight

Camera inspired by insect eyes can see 180 degrees, has almost infinite depth of field

www.engadget.com
Technologists have been drawing inspiration from the insect world for a long time. And folks working on robotics really seem to love their creepy-crawlies and buzzing arthropods. Researchers at the University of Illinois are looking to our eight-legged planet mates, not for mobility lessons, but as a reference for...
Camera inspired by insect eyes can see 180 degrees, has almost infinite depth of field

The first digital, bug-like compound eye camera sees 180 degrees, near-infinite DoF

www.extremetech.com
An interdisciplinary team of computer scientists and engineers, led by John Rogers of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has succeeded in building the first digital cameras that mimic the compound, many-faceted eyes of dragonflies, bees, and other insects. These digital cameras, which are hemispherical and flexible like their insectoid...
The first digital, bug-like compound eye camera sees 180 degrees, near-infinite DoF

2013 'Doodle 4 Google' top 50 winners selected, require your judgment

www.engadget.com
There's little in life finer than pitting youths against each other in battle, which Google's annual "Doodle 4 Google" contest clearly appreciates. The competition takes thousands of Google logo doodle entries and pits them down from thousands to 50, one per US State, and organizes those entries by grade...
2013 'Doodle 4 Google' top 50 winners selected, require your judgment
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