digital rights management

digital rights management

What Book Publishers Should Learn From Harry Potter

paidcontent.org
After months of anticipation, the e-book versions of author J.K. Rowling’s phenomenally successful Harry Potter series are now available through Rowling’s Pottermore online unit, and as my PaidContent colleague Laura Owen has noted in her post on the launch, Rowling has chosen to do a number of interesting things...
What Book Publishers Should Learn From Harry Potter

The DeanBeat: Microsoft's costly mistake at E3 and how to recover from it

venturebeat.com
LOS ANGELES — The folks at Microsoft must have been thinking about bigger targets like Comcast or Disney. Because when they weren’t looking, Sony came back and stole away the hearts of gamers at the 2013 Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles this week. Microsoft was the undisputed leader...
The DeanBeat: Microsoft's costly mistake at E3 and how to recover from it
The Book Publishers Caused This Lawsuit, But They Didn’t Need To

During hearing, Congress defends phone unlocking rights

arstechnica.com
Congress today held a hearing to discuss legal protection for all cell phone unlockers. According to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), those in attendance were in agreement with the idea that individuals should be able to switch carriers without worrying about legal penalties. The meeting took place after unlocking...
During hearing, Congress defends phone unlocking rights
Xbox games director clueless about why fans hate always-on consoles

Piracy is yesterday's worry for today's 'artisan authors'

www.guardian.co.uk
File sharing and self-publishing are becoming the norm for a generation of writers looking beyond a moribund publishing eco-systemThe community of SF writers has reason to dislike digital copying, or "piracy" as it's commonly labelled in the tabloid press. Genre writers exist, by and large, in the publishing mid-list, where...
Piracy is yesterday's worry for today's 'artisan authors'

Good DRM Makes Bad Neighbors: This Is The Content Protection Tipping Point

techcrunch.com
For people who have been doing just one thing for a long, long time, it’s amazing how many content distributors get things so catastrophically wrong. These last few weeks brought us quite a few unique situations, including the launch of Apple’s iBook Author software as well as a number of...
Good DRM Makes Bad Neighbors: This Is The Content Protection Tipping Point

Independent booksellers sue Amazon, publishers for monopoly

www.electronista.com
independent booksellers The Book House, Posman Books, and Fiction Addiction are suing Amazon and the "Big Six" publishers consisting of Hachette, HarperCollins, Macmillan, Penguin, Random House, and Simon & Schuster. The suit accuses the seven companies of monopolizing the ebook market by selling titles encumbered by draconian digital rights management...
Independent booksellers sue Amazon, publishers for monopoly
Apple and Amazon want to let you resell your digital stuff (if that even makes sense)
Amazon Web Services Launches CloudHSM, A Dedicated Hardware Security Appliance For Managing Cryptographic Keys

Could Hachette Be The First Big-6 Publisher To Drop DRM On E-Books?

paidcontent.org
DRM is just “a speedbump,” Hachette’s Maja Thomas said at a copyright conference this afternoon. However, opinion within Hachette is clearly divided. DRM “doesn’t stop anyone from pirating,” Hachette SVP digital Thomas said in a publishing panel at Copyright Clearance Center’s OnCopyright 2012. “It just makes it more difficult,...
Could Hachette Be The First Big-6 Publisher To Drop DRM On E-Books?
How to prepare your IT department for a mobile workforce

Hey, Online Services: Why Can't You Keep Up With Demand?

readwrite.com
Theoretically, online services shouldn't ever get so mobbed by customers that they can't deliver a game or service, because it should be ridiculously easy to bring on additional capacity to meet demand. And yet here in the real world, exactly these sorts of failures seem to crop up with dismaying...
Hey, Online Services: Why Can't You Keep Up With Demand?

Publishers Starting to Reject e-Book DRM

www.readwriteweb.com
One publisher does not a trend make, but Macmillan imprint and science-fiction house Tor/Forge's decision to abandon DRM this July may be a sign of things to come. Tor/Forge is dropping DRM because its customers, and authors, have been asking for DRM-free titles. The game isn't won yet, but...
Publishers Starting to Reject e-Book DRM

Publishers Begin Bailing On Ebook Copyright Protection Technology

www.betabeat.com
It’s long been a thorn in the side of ereader owners, but major publishers--one eye fixed firmly on the fate of the recording industry--have insisted that ebooks come fully loaded with digital rights management technology. But that’s starting to crack. Today Macmillan subsidiary Tom Doherty Associates (home to beloved scifi...
Publishers Begin Bailing On Ebook Copyright Protection Technology

From Harry Potter to hoodies: Here’s the week’s media news in review

thenextweb.com
There was a lot of news to chew over from this past week in the media, so we’ve taken a broad view of events and packaged them up here in an easy-to-digest bite. Where else would Harry Potter find himself up against Al Jazeera? Reading rights The wait is finally...
From Harry Potter to hoodies: Here’s the week’s media news in review

Yup, Jailbreaking Your iPad Really Is Illegal

readwrite.com
Want to play old school Nintendo games on your iPad? Download Google Play apps from foreign countries to your Galaxy Tab? If so, you'll have to break the law. That's because under new rules issued by the U.S. government, jailbreaking (or in the case of Android, rooting) tablets becomes a...
Yup, Jailbreaking Your iPad Really Is Illegal

ContentGuard to partner with top Korean mobile company

www.geekwire.com
ContentGuard, a subsidiary of the Kirkland-based patent holding firm Pendrell Corp., announced a partnership today with one of Korea’s top mobile handset makers. ContentGuard and Pantech will team up to help improve the content experience on Pantech phones and tablets. The South Korean company was founded in 1991 and is the third-leading...
ContentGuard to partner with top Korean mobile company
Appageddon aftermath: Apple, where do your negative reviews go?
Myspace's newest problem: Credibility

Congress finally introduces a smartphone unlocking bill that doesn't stink

venturebeat.com
July 9-10, 2013 San Francisco, CA Early Bird Tickets on Sale For someone running on less than two hours of sleep, smartphone unlocking activist Sina Khanifar is feeling pretty good. That’s because members of Congress today introduced “Unlocking Technology Act of 2013“, a new bill that would make it...
Congress finally introduces a smartphone unlocking bill that doesn't stink

Open vs. Closed: Google Takes on Amazon and Apple in e-Books

gigaom.com
As it stands now, the e-book industry is dominated by two closed and proprietary giants: Amazon and Apple. Both have e-book platforms — the Kindle and the iPad — which they design, manufacture and control, and both have been busy trying to convince book publishers to do business with...
Open vs. Closed: Google Takes on Amazon and Apple in e-Books

For DRM-Free Content, Look for the New FSF Logo

www.pcworld.com
This new label from the Free Software Foundation aims to help buyers find e-books and other media distributed without digital rights management restrictions....
For DRM-Free Content, Look for the New FSF Logo
The music industry dropped DRM years ago. So why does it persist on e-books?

Chinese Users Get Nokia Music Service Sans DRM

yro.slashdot.org
angry tapir writes "Nokia has launched a version of its Comes With Music download service without digital rights management (DRM) for the Chinese market. Currently, the service is available in about 30 countries, but in those countries the music, unlike in China, is copy-protected." Read more of this story at...
Chinese Users Get Nokia Music Service Sans DRM

Apple fixes app corruption bug but developers dispute breadth of problem

www.guardian.co.uk
Developer says tens of thousands of users would have been affected, and timing of problem with apps also a source of dispute as Apple clears up 'crashing bug' caused by server DRMApple says that the problem with app corruption that hit scores of programs this week has been fixed and...
Apple fixes app corruption bug but developers dispute breadth of problem

Who holds the encryption keys?

www.computerworld.com
Experts and IT leaders offer strategies for getting the most from the latest encryption and digital rights management technologies....
Who holds the encryption keys?

New Lawsuit Could Completely Change The Way E-books Are Sold

www.businessinsider.com
Three independent booksellers are suing Amazon and six big publishers over an e-book deal they say gives big companies an unfair monopoly.  In the class-action complaint, Book House of Stuyvesant Plaza, Fiction Addiction, and Posman Books claim Amazon, Random House, Penguin, Hachette, HarperCollins, Simon & Schuster, and Macmillan have confidential...
New Lawsuit Could Completely Change The Way E-books Are Sold

Tor Books says cutting DRM out of its e-books hasn't hurt business

arstechnica.com
Early this week, Tor Books, a subsidiary of Tom Doherty Associates and the world's leading publisher of science fiction, gave an update on how its decision to do away with Digital Rights Management (DRM) schemes has impacted the company. Long story short: it hasn't, really. Tor announced last April...
Tor Books says cutting DRM out of its e-books hasn't hurt business

Fox, Warner, SanDisk, WD announce Project Phenix for DRM

www.ipodnn.com
Some of the same studios that developed the the UltraViolet digital standard are launching a new initiative to make content available across multiple devices. SanDisk, Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Group and Western Digital have formed a new working group dubbed the Secure Content Storage Association...
Fox, Warner, SanDisk, WD announce Project Phenix for DRM
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