electrodes

electrodes

The gaming headset that (literally) shocks your brain to attention

Korean researchers develop new flexible, more stable lithium-ion battery

www.engadget.com
Researchers from South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology have developed a new "shape-conformable" polymer electrolytes that could help craft those flexible display handsets of the future. Thanks to the nano-materials used, these polymers behave like more typical liquefied electrolytes but would create, according to the country's...
Korean researchers develop new flexible, more stable lithium-ion battery
This new microbattery is interesting, but not as good as the hype

Will we ever have Iron Man exoskeletons?

www.extremetech.com
The threatening grimace, exchanged in the wild by beasts armed to the teeth, has morphed among civil men into a warm but ineffectual smile -– a Faustian bargain we question every time a deep growl startles us on a twilight jog. Reports from the vanguard of science tantalize us with...
Will we ever have Iron Man exoskeletons?
Rice University creates spray-on, paint-based lithium-ion batteries

3D-printed charred micro bunny electrodes for brain stimulation

www.extremetech.com
A new 2-photon printing process created by researchers in Japan, takes 3D printing to the next logical step. By developing a high carbon and stable resin, the completed build can be post-processed in an oven into a carburized, and conductive -- bunny....
3D-printed charred micro bunny electrodes for brain stimulation

Apple’s new iPad uses SHA to boost resolution. What the heck does that mean?

www.extremetech.com
The iPad 3′s QXGA resolution and quad-graphics-core A5X SoC have had the tech industry buzzing for the past week. One of the most common questions everyone is asking has been how Apple managed to pack a 2048×1536 display into a 9.7-inch form factor without killing battery life or jacking up...
Apple’s new iPad uses SHA to boost resolution. What the heck does that mean?

Curing depression and super-charging cranial capacity with deep brain stimulation

www.extremetech.com
Last year, we wrote about a technology called tDCS — transcranial direct current stimulation — that improves your mental acuity by passing a small electrical current through your brain. The US Army and DARPA are already using tDCS to speed up the training of drone pilots and snipers, and one...
Curing depression and super-charging cranial capacity with deep brain stimulation

Super High Aperture: it's why the new iPad's Retina display is so dense

www.engadget.com
Super High Aperture. Heard of it? Probably not, but thanks to Apple, you'll probably long for days when you didn't in just a few months. According to an in-depth look from the folks at DisplaySearch, the aforesaid technique is the primary reason that Apple was able to shove 2,048 x...
Super High Aperture: it's why the new iPad's Retina display is so dense

Don't try this at home: Researchers use tDCS to release your brain's strongest opioid painkillers

www.extremetech.com
A team of international researchers headed up by the University of Michigan has used noninvasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to release endogenous opioids — the human body’s most powerful, euphoria-inducing painkillers that are very similar to opiates such as morphine. This approach is significant because releasing these opioids is...
Don't try this at home: Researchers use tDCS to release your brain's strongest opioid painkillers
Retinal implant restores vision for eight blind people

Sennheiser Orpheus HE90 headphones ears-on

www.engadget.com
This year at CES -- as always -- there's been waves and waves of new technology. Not everything of interest is always white hot, though. We're talking about the above pair of headphones -- the Orpheus HE90 from Sennheiser. Those in the know will be somewhat familiar with these...
Sennheiser Orpheus HE90 headphones ears-on
Flash memory chip built out of single-atom-thick components
There's gold in them thar batteries

Inhabitat's Week in Green: ten earth activities, transnatural stools and wood ash bike frames

www.engadget.com
Each week our friends at Inhabitat recap the week's most interesting green developments and clean tech news for us -- it's the Week in Green. Happy Earth Day! In honor of Earth Week, this week we took a moment to think about the origins of this now-global event, exploring...
Inhabitat's Week in Green: ten earth activities, transnatural stools and wood ash bike frames
Passive authentication using a wristwatch and your body's bioelectric signature
Remember the artificial leaf? Startup turns to making a flow battery instead

How Apple managed to incorporate a Retina Display into the new iPad

thenextweb.com
The new iPad’s Retina Display was perhaps the most expected feature to be included in Apple’s new tablet, especially after it incorporated the high-resolution display into both its iPhone 4 and iPhone 4S smartphones. But don’t let that take away from the fact that the technology behind its iPad display isn’t impressive,...
How Apple managed to incorporate a Retina Display into the new iPad

Duke melds two rats' minds through the internet, Spock may not approve

www.engadget.com
Some would say the internet already lets us share every minute detail of our thoughts, much to our followers' dismay. Duke University isn't deterred by our behavior -- if anything, it just took oversharing literally by connecting two rats' minds in an experiment, first in a lab and ultimately...
Duke melds two rats' minds through the internet, Spock may not approve

Bionic eye promises vision for the blind

www.guardian.co.uk
Monash University is preparing to launch technology that should allow blind users to make out objects and other peopleWorld-leading technology that could help restore vision to a large number of Australia's 45,000 blind people is set to emerge from a Melbourne university.The Monash Vision system, developed by a team of...
Bionic eye promises vision for the blind

EPFL mixes graphene and molybdenite to make very efficient, flexible flash memory

www.engadget.com
We've seen graphene chips, and we've seen molybdenite chips. What would happen if we combined the two? If EPFL's experimental flash memory is any clue, we might get one of the better blends since chocolate met peanut butter. The chip uses graphene's high conductivity for the memory itself, as...
EPFL mixes graphene and molybdenite to make very efficient, flexible flash memory

NMR imaging used to catch performance-killing flaws inside batteries

arstechnica.com
Batteries based on lithium now power everything from our watches to our cars, and we've made major strides towards stuffing more energy into them more quickly over the last several years. But there are limits to how quickly a battery can charge, and pushing past them can cause the...
NMR imaging used to catch performance-killing flaws inside batteries

Nano vacuum tubes could give a second life to the guitarist's best friend

www.engadget.com
Pretty much the only place you see vacuum tubes any more is inside a quality audio amp. But, once upon a time, they were the primary ingredient in any piece of electronic equipment, including computers. The glass tubes have since been replaced with the smaller, less fragile and cheaper...
Nano vacuum tubes could give a second life to the guitarist's best friend
Scientists link rat brains together over the internet to transfer sensory information

Why Cognitive Enhancement Is in Your Future (and Your Past)

www.theatlantic.com
Using technology to enhance our brains sounds terrifying, but using tools to make ourselves smarter may be part of humans' nature. It could be that we are on the verge of a great deluge of cognitive enhancement. Or it's possible that new brain-enhancing drugs and technologies will be nothing...
Why Cognitive Enhancement Is in Your Future (and Your Past)
Microscopic laser-molded bunny could help fight brain disorders

Revenge is ours: extracting energy from a cockroach

arstechnica.com
I love science. The joy of discovery in pure research combines with applied science to leave me fantasizing about future technology. Add in the occasional WTF moment and the comedy inherent in poorly prepared presentations, and you have the perfect occupation. Unfortunately, science sometimes attracts people who pull the...
Revenge is ours: extracting energy from a cockroach

Watch Squid Cells Bump to Cypress Hill's 'Insane in the Brain'

www.theatlantic.com
Via Tumblr's reigning science guru Joe Hansen comes a biology video made to go viral: audio of an early-1990s hip hop track stimulates synchronized pulsing chromatophores (pigmented cells) in a squid fin. It's amazing. The video was created by Backyard Brains, two guys who hook up electrodes to cockroach parts to...
Watch Squid Cells Bump to Cypress Hill's 'Insane in the Brain'
New electrode material could lead to powerful rechargeable sodium batteries
Researchers pave way for much brighter OLEDs
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