electrons

electrons

Green Pea galaxies: a part of diet for cosmic reionization

arstechnica.com
Six of the Green Pea galaxies found in galaxy survey data by citizen scientists. These galaxies may resemble forms in the early Universe, which produced the radiation that ionized much of the gas in the cosmos. Anne Jaskot A major triumph of citizen science was the identification of the...
Green Pea galaxies: a part of diet for cosmic reionization

IBM snaps an image of electric charge

news.cnet.com
IBM Research isolates how electrons rearrange themselves in a molecular bond, an insight that could advance molecular-scale transistors and inexpensive solar cells. [Read more]...
IBM snaps an image of electric charge

Steve Jobs Predicted Siri and the App Store In 1983 (AAPL)

www.businessinsider.com
In 1983, Steve Jobs appeared at an event called the International Design Conference in Aspen to speak to a crowd of artists and designers on the theme "The Future Isn't What It Used To Be." Life, Liberty, and Technology has posted an audio recording of his full presentation. (Previously, only...
Steve Jobs Predicted Siri and the App Store In 1983 (AAPL)

University of Michigan makes silicon from liquid metal, aims for low-cost chips

www.engadget.com
Forming silicon normally requires extreme temperatures of more than 2,000F, with the expensive energy to match. The University of Michigan has developed a technique involving liquid metal that could shed most of the heat -- and cost. By coating a liquid gallium electrode with silicon tetrachloride, researchers can generate...
University of Michigan makes silicon from liquid metal, aims for low-cost chips

Embrace the light! Researchers built all-optical device for faster broadband

gigaom.com
Researchers at the University of Minnesota have built an all-optical device that is able to flip a switch. The technology might strike many as esoteric, but getting light to change state (from on to off) based only on a signal from another light is a big deal that could pave...
Embrace the light! Researchers built all-optical device for faster broadband

When Telstar met JFK

news.cnet.com
Fifty years ago today, the little Telstar satellite relayed the first TV transmission across the Atlantic. It wasn't long before President Kennedy had his black-and-white electrons beamed from the U.S. to Europe. [Read more]...
When Telstar met JFK

Sent From My Phone, In Bed

techcrunch.com
Our beds used to be finite. A limited range of activities took place there. We’d sleep, or try to, make love, eat, and maybe read a paperback. But we could only hide from the world for so long. The nagging puppet strings of our desire to learn and experience would...
Sent From My Phone, In Bed
Researchers build tiny random number generator for NFC chips

Engineers Solve 80-Year Old Puzzle to Make Computer Modeling 100,000 Times Faster [Science]

gizmodo.com
A quantum physics breakthrough that can predict the kinetic energy of electrons in simple metals—and semiconductors—will enable computers to simulate the behavior of new materials up to 100,000 times faster than they currently can. That's huge. Princeton engineer Emily Carter led the project, which took an equation by Llewellyn Hilleth...
Engineers Solve 80-Year Old Puzzle to Make Computer Modeling 100,000 Times Faster [Science]

New single ion clock is '100 times more precise' than existing atomic models

www.engadget.com
Researchers at the University of South Wales have developed a new type of atomic clock that measures an atom's neutron orbit instead of the electron's flight path. This method is apparently accurate to 19 decimal places, with several lasers shifting electrons in a certain way, allowing Professor Victor Flambaum...
New single ion clock is '100 times more precise' than existing atomic models
Carbon nanotube circuits could outsource their heat to a separate device
Nuclear clocks could use neutrons to beat atomic accuracy by 100 times

University of Georgia stops plant photosynthesis to generate solar power

www.engadget.com
There's a more efficient way to harvest energy from the backyard than by wiring up hapless critters. Researchers at the University of Georgia have proof: they've discovered a way to generate electricity from plants through hijacking the photosynthesis process. By altering the proteins inside a plant cell's thylakoids, which...
University of Georgia stops plant photosynthesis to generate solar power
Squeezing more information out of the cosmic microwave background
A single molecule magnet may enable quantum computing

Extreme pressure could force hydrogen into a high-temperature superconductor

arstechnica.com
Superconductivity typically demands very low temperatures, requiring liquid helium or similar means to bring the temperature down to where electrical resistance is zero. Even the high-temperature superconductors have yet to come anywhere close to room temperature, topping out at approximately 110 degrees C above absolute zero (which is still...
Extreme pressure could force hydrogen into a high-temperature superconductor
Neutron-based clock could remain accurate for billions of years

Nano vacuum tubes could give a second life to the guitarist's best friend

www.engadget.com
Pretty much the only place you see vacuum tubes any more is inside a quality audio amp. But, once upon a time, they were the primary ingredient in any piece of electronic equipment, including computers. The glass tubes have since been replaced with the smaller, less fragile and cheaper...
Nano vacuum tubes could give a second life to the guitarist's best friend
Double time-reversal asymmetry could explain weird material behavior
Holey metal, Batman! Extraordinary optics make it appear transparent

IBM manufactures light-based 'nanophotonic' chips to let the terrabytes flow

www.engadget.com
IBM's taken a large step toward computer chips that use photons instead of electrons by manufacturing the first 90nm silicon-based optical processing modules. It did so using the CMOS nanophotonics technology we first saw back in 2010, creating tranceivers capable of 25Gbps transfer speeds. By multiplexing a large number...
IBM manufactures light-based 'nanophotonic' chips to let the terrabytes flow

Physicists construct the most accurate clock the world has ever seen

www.engadget.com
Calling a clock the most accurate ever may sound like hyperbole, but physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colorado have built a pair of devices that can claim that title. The team used an optical lattice to address an issue that plagues atomic clockmakers:...
Physicists construct the most accurate clock the world has ever seen

Linking simple chemistry to something like life

arstechnica.com
A computer model of a growing membrane. Szostak Lab Origin of life researchers have made impressive progress in recent years, showing that simple chemicals can combine to make nucleotides, the building blocks of DNA and RNA. Given the right conditions, these nucleotides can combine into ever-longer stretches of RNA....
Linking simple chemistry to something like life

Decade-long Memory Crusade to Live On At Rambus

blogs.wsj.com
Unity Semiconductor was one of those really ambitious Silicon Valley startups, working on nothing less than a fundamentally new way to store data on computer chips. Its leaders have given up the dream of building an independent company, but not the idea that led to its founding in 2002. “We...
Decade-long Memory Crusade to Live On At Rambus
Clock made from a single atom could lead to a precise mass measurement

Stanford researchers find electrical current stemming from plants

news.stanford.edu
For the first time, researchers have harvested electrons directly from individual photosynthesizing cells, a possible first step toward generating electricity directly from plants....
Stanford researchers find electrical current stemming from plants

Quantum computer gets an undo button

arstechnica.com
Quantum mechanics is, mathematically, quite simple. But it has implications that require people to think differently about the world. One particularly hard-to-grasp idea is that, on the surface, some knowledge precludes obtaining other knowledge. This is a consequence of how we obtain it. In an innovative experiment, researchers from...
Quantum computer gets an undo button

IBM creates consistent electron spin inside semiconductors, takes spintronics one twirl closer

www.engadget.com
A fundamental challenge of developing spintronics, or computing where the rotation of electrons carries instructions and other data rather than the charge, has been getting the electrons to spin for long enough to shuttle data to its destination in the first place. IBM and ETH Zurich claim to be...
IBM creates consistent electron spin inside semiconductors, takes spintronics one twirl closer
Researchers pave way for much brighter OLEDs

Holey chip! IBM drills holes into optical chip for terabit-per-second speed

arstechnica.com
IBM researchers have built a prototype optical chip that can transfer a terabit of data per second, using an innovative design requiring 48 tiny holes drilled into a standard CMOS chip, facilitating the movement of light. Much faster and more power-efficient than today's optics, the so-called "Holey Optochip" technology...
Holey chip! IBM drills holes into optical chip for terabit-per-second speed
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