medical applications

medical applications

AthenaHealth scoops up Epocrates to bring a mobile toolset to doctors

venturebeat.com
Med-tech is off to a bold start this year with a hot acquisition, which will serve to consolidate the market. Epocrates Inc., a medical applications company based in Silicon Valley, is being scooped up by AthenaHealth for $293 million. According to a company press release, AthenaHealth will pay $11.75 per...
AthenaHealth scoops up Epocrates to bring a mobile toolset to doctors

A discussion with David Farber: bandwidth, cyber security, and the obsolescence of the Internet

radar.oreilly.com
David Farber, a veteran of Internet technology and politics, dropped by Cambridge, Mass. today and was gracious enough to grant me some time in between his numerous meetings. On leave from Carnegie Mellon, Dave still intervenes in numerous policy discussions related to the Internet and "plays in Washington," as...
A discussion with David Farber: bandwidth, cyber security, and the obsolescence of the Internet
DARPA working to bring dissolvable, 'transient electronics' to the military

The Latest Beneficiary of 3D Printing: Clueless, Frazzled New Doctors?

betabeat.com
3D print yourself some help. It’s so very easy to overestimate the power of 3D printing. DIY semiautomatics, for example, are a terrifying prospect, but they’re not exactly right around the corner. Likewise, it’s easy to dream of a world where surgeons can simply 3D print a new liver. But...
The Latest Beneficiary of 3D Printing: Clueless, Frazzled New Doctors?

US Ignite: Designing Apps For Ultra-High Speed

pandodaily.com
Tomorrow, Obama signs an executive order to begin implementing an ultra-high speed network across the US under the project name of US Ignite. It’s similar to what Google Fiber has been toying with in Kansas City, but with a public services tilt. The 100Mbps+ low latency network will connect up...
US Ignite: Designing Apps For Ultra-High Speed

iRobot's RP-VITA mobile telepresence robot iPad app eyes-on (video)

www.engadget.com
It's a mouthful, we know, but the gist of the below video is this: a few months back, iRobot unveiled RP-VITA, a teleconferencing robot with a rolling base. The company's got all sorts of plans for the 'bot, but is starting things off with medical applications. It's co-branded the...
iRobot's RP-VITA mobile telepresence robot iPad app eyes-on (video)

83-year old woman gets replacement 3D printed titanium jaw, makes her the coolest member of the bridge club

www.engadget.com
3D printers are continuing to force their way into medical applications and the latest beneficiary is an 83-year old woman. She's the first patient to receive a titanium jaw crafted by those not-so dimensionally-challenged printers. The method was developed by the BIOMED Research Institute at Hasselt University in Belgium and...
83-year old woman gets replacement 3D printed titanium jaw, makes her the coolest member of the bridge club
3Gear Systems Hacks Kinects To Create The Future of Gestural Computing
Your next smartphone may be able to see through walls

Technology breakthrough may let phones see through walls

gigaom.com
While the smartphone of today has become a pretty amazing sensor for discovering the real world, the smartphone of tomorrow may just give you the ability to have X-ray vision. That’s the potential implication of a breakthrough at the University of Texas, Dallas, where researchers say they have taken a big...
Technology breakthrough may let phones see through walls

Has the ship already sailed for controlling Windows 8 with Kinect tech?

thenextweb.com
In October Micosoft will release what may its biggest gamble ever with Windows 8. The new OS will stretch across desktops, laptops and tablets, including Microsoft’s own Surface tablet (another big gamble – unless perhaps it costs $199). Windows 8 Phone will also come out (perhaps earlier than Windows 8),...
Has the ship already sailed for controlling Windows 8 with Kinect tech?

7 markets in which tablet growth will explode

tech.fortune.cnn.com
Forget PCs, tablets have captured the technology industry's attention and is providng much of its profits. Here are the areas where tablets are poised to dominate. By Greg Andrews, contributor FORTUNE -- Tablets are compelling devices that have captivated much of the tech industry over the past year. Most tablets...
7 markets in which tablet growth will explode
The specter of D.C. overregulation haunts health entrepreneurs

Fake jellyfish made from rat cells have a place in our hearts (video)

www.engadget.com
There's a whole sea of jellyfish out there ready to sting indiscriminately. So, why do we keep trying to make them? Scientists from Harvard and Caltech have a pretty good reason for creating fake jellies -- they hope to mend broken hearts by adapting their 'pumping' style of movement....
Fake jellyfish made from rat cells have a place in our hearts (video)
Laser-stimulated muscle tissue could be used to build 'bio-integrated' robots

A pair of geologic clocks get updates

arstechnica.com
Radioactivity revolutionized the 20th century, not only through weapons, electrical generation, and medical applications, but also by shining a light into Earth’s dark prehistory. Geologists in Darwin’s time could only indirectly guess at the deep time they were studying. The advent of radiometric dating allowed us to measure the...
A pair of geologic clocks get updates

Dissolving electronics are a surprisingly simple answer to implantable tech

www.extremetech.com
Despite the many things in our lives that we already have DARPA to thank for, this week there was something else announced. Transient electronics is the newest advance to come from the research group, as well as their partners at Tufts University, University of Illinois, and Northwestern. Transient — essentially dissolving...
Dissolving electronics are a surprisingly simple answer to implantable tech
How big is your baby? Doctors use design to uncover insights in children's health
The New "Handmade" (Part Two)

Researchers create Meshworm robot, beat it up (video)

www.engadget.com
We've seen a number of options for controlling real worms, but never a worm robot, until now. Enter Meshworm, the latest creation from researchers at MIT, Harvard University and Seoul National University. The bot is made from "artificial muscle" composed of a flexible mesh tube segmented by loops of...
Researchers create Meshworm robot, beat it up (video)

Researchers create incredibly thin solar cells flexible enough to wrap around a human hair

www.engadget.com
You've probably heard that the sun is strong enough to power our planet many times over, but without a practical method of harnessing that energy, there's no way to take full advantage. An incredibly thin and light solar cell could go a long way to accomplishing that on a...
Researchers create incredibly thin solar cells flexible enough to wrap around a human hair
Scientists create a working microscopic tractor beam

House lawmakers to examine regulation of medical apps

www.washingtonpost.com
House lawmakers said Tuesday that they will conduct a three-day series of hearings next week to look at how the Food and Drug Administration should regulate medical applications on smartphones and tablets. Lawmakers from the House Energy and Commerce committee will look specifically at how regulation affects patients, physicians and...
House lawmakers to examine regulation of medical apps

Can smartphones solve the healthcare crisis? 4 startups say yes

venturebeat.com
July 9-10, 2013 San Francisco, CA Early Bird Tickets on Sale SAN FRANCISCO- Demo Mobile kicked off this morning with presentations from four mobile health startups. Each of these companies is applying mobile technology to the medical field to give people more control over their bodies, or to streamline...
Can smartphones solve the healthcare crisis? 4 startups say yes
With Its New Medical Language iPad App, Swiftkey Edges Closer To The iOS Platform

NTT DoCoMo hands-free videophone prototype replaces that off-center webcam stare with your digital doppelganger (hands-on)

www.engadget.com
In a sort of reverse-Project Glass, one of DoCoMo's latest prototypes flips its cameras back at the wearer. This hands-free videophone headset strings ties together seven separate cameras, each recording 720p video from wide-angle lenses. Aside from the single camera pointing behind the user (and beaming the background image),...
NTT DoCoMo hands-free videophone prototype replaces that off-center webcam stare with your digital doppelganger (hands-on)
Prickly porcupine quills may hold clues for medical technology
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