national security administration

national security administration

Will the latest NSA surveillance scandal be a wake-up call for the power of data?

gigaom.com
Remember when the New York Times tried to make that whole, your-cell-phone-is-a-tracking-device idea happen? Well, it seemed that most of the population didn’t care. But perhaps the news that the National Security Administration has been collecting phone metadata on Verizon’s customers inside the U.S. might help people get hip to...
Will the latest NSA surveillance scandal be a wake-up call for the power of data?

Report: NSA Secretly Collecting Phone Records Of All Verizon Calls

techcrunch.com
The National Security Administration is secretly collecting phone record information for all calls on the Verizon network. “Under the terms of the blanket order, the numbers of both parties on a call are handed over, as is location data, call duration, unique identifiers, and the time and duration of all...
Report: NSA Secretly Collecting Phone Records Of All Verizon Calls

President Obama To Visit Silicon Valley Tonight, As Reports Of NSA's Tech Spying Come To Light

techcrunch.com
President Obama’s official schedule indicates that he is currently aboard Air Force One and en route to the San Francisco Bay Area for private events being held tonight with some of Silicon Valley’s most elite players. The president’s visit comes within hours of massive new revelations about the United States...
President Obama To Visit Silicon Valley Tonight, As Reports Of NSA's Tech Spying Come To Light

Another Blow For BlackBerry's Battle For Beltway Belts

www.fastcompany.com
A longstanding ally of Research in Motion, the U.S. government has dealt the Blackberry maker a punishing new defeat in its battle for Beltway belts. The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency (ICE) is terminating its contract with RIM, Reuters reported this week. It "can no longer meet the mobile...
Another Blow For BlackBerry's Battle For Beltway Belts

Report: Tech companies didn't allow feds "direct access" to their servers, but they agreed to help

gigaom.com
Several major internet companies may not have given the federal government “direct access” to their servers to facilitate snooping for personal data, as was initially alleged by a report earlier this week, but many of them did agree to set up special access to their data when requested through secret...
Report: Tech companies didn't allow feds "direct access" to their servers, but they agreed to help

Blanket Surveillance. Total Secrecy. What Could Possibly Go Wrong?

techcrunch.com
Imagine that one day you came home to find a shiny little bubble of one-way glass in an upper corner of every single room, and a notice left on your kitchen table: “As required by the Safe Society Act, we have installed remotely controlled cameras throughout your home. (Also your...
Blanket Surveillance. Total Secrecy. What Could Possibly Go Wrong?
Cylance gets $15M to put a little more prevention into your security plan

Former Teenage Hacker And Twitter Co-Founder, Jack Dorsey, Says Hacking Isn't A Crime

techcrunch.com
Before he was upending the media and financial services, Twitter Co-founder Jack Dorsey was a proud hacker. During a 60 Minutes interview with Lara Logan, he recounted how hacking helped launch his professional career after he exposed vulnerabilities in a software company’s network, “Jack Dorsey: I found a way into the...
Former Teenage Hacker And Twitter Co-Founder, Jack Dorsey, Says Hacking Isn't A Crime

On Spying, A Deficit Of Trust

techcrunch.com
After it was revealed that the National Security Administration was collecting phone records of every single U.S. call on the Verizon network, even President Obama’s most ardent supporters are losing faith that he would usher in a more transparent government. Loyal Democrat, former Vice President and Internet inventor, Al Gore...
On Spying, A Deficit Of Trust

Feds give vote of confidence to Google Chrome, Android

arstechnica.com
Google software has won at least two important endorsements from the federal government in the past few months with the US State Department adopting the Chrome browser and the National Security Administration deploying an Android phone that complies with the department's tough information security rules. Secretary of State Hillary...
Feds give vote of confidence to Google Chrome, Android

5 Mobile Security Lessons From the Department of Defense

www.computerworld.com
Several years ago, the National Security Administration wasted millions on a circuit-switched approach to mobile security strategy. With help from the Department of Defense, the NSA is doing things differently now. Enterprise CIOs can learn a few things from the effort, too....
5 Mobile Security Lessons From the Department of Defense

How the NSA might snoop personal web data without the provider's knowledge

gigaom.com
One of the biggest questions out of the NSA snooping controversy was how much 9 tech vendors –  Microsoft, Yahoo, Google, Facebook, PalTalk, AOL, Skype( msft), YouTube and Apple —  knew about a National Security Administration program for snooping on their users data. Facebook’s data center in Prineville, Ore They all denied...
How the NSA might snoop personal web data without the provider's knowledge
Patriot Act author says NSA is going too far

Report: NSA Collects Data Directly From Servers Of Google, Apple, Microsoft, Facebook And More

techcrunch.com
The Washington Post is reporting a top-secret National Security Administration data-mining program that taps directly into the Google, Facebook, Microsoft and YouTube servers. ”The National Security Agency and the FBI are tapping directly into the central servers of nine leading U.S. Internet companies, extracting audio, video, photographs, e-mails, documents and connection...
Report: NSA Collects Data Directly From Servers Of Google, Apple, Microsoft, Facebook And More

This Is What's Wrong With College: Student Expelled For Exposing Network's Privacy Flaws

techcrunch.com
In a telling example of higher education’s misplaced priorities, a Canadian student was expelled for finding privacy flaws in a university’s computer network. Fresh-faced 20-year-old hacker, Hamed Al-Khabaz, attempted to warn school administrators about a vulnerability he discovered in his school’s network while working on a mobile app, but instead...
This Is What's Wrong With College: Student Expelled For Exposing Network's Privacy Flaws
Twitter's latest hire: Epic Apple hacker Charlie Miller
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