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'Clone by phone' makes for faster vaccine preparation

Chrome for Android also gets bumped up to version 27

arstechnica.com
Yesterday we reported that Google officially updated the stable version of Chrome to Chrome 27, introducing several new features and bug fixes. Chrome for Android (stable version) also received similar treatment and has been promoted to Chrome 27. It comes with several options that were previously included in past versions...
Chrome for Android also gets bumped up to version 27
App developer calls critic "f*cken little know it all"; site goes down

Outgoing FCC chair: Wireless dominance by AT&T and Verizon a "very bad thing"

arstechnica.com
Julius Genachowski, the outgoing chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) today touted his agency's record in promoting wireless competition over the last four years. And he warned that allowing AT&T and Verizon Wireless, the market leaders, to snap up all of the spectrum in an upcoming wireless auction...
Outgoing FCC chair: Wireless dominance by AT&T and Verizon a "very bad thing"
This new microbattery is interesting, but not as good as the hype
How much would you pay for a stylus? Samsung's Galaxy Note 8.0 reviewed

Barnes & Noble to stop building Nook tablets, seeks hardware partners

arstechnica.com
Barnes & Noble has announced that it will stop manufacturing Nook tablets, but the company is not getting out of the tablet market completely. Instead of building its own, Barnes & Noble will attempt to create a co-branded line of tablets with third-party manufacturers. The announcement does not affect...
Barnes & Noble to stop building Nook tablets, seeks hardware partners
Scientists poke frozen mammoth, liquid blood squirts out

Seven apps Ars readers use to chase away the iOS default-app blues

arstechnica.com
Last weekend the Ars staff got together and told you what apps we like to use on our iOS devices when Apple's tools let us down. As is usually the case, our recommendations didn't even scratch the surface, and all of you had even more recommendations to fix what...
Seven apps Ars readers use to chase away the iOS default-app blues

Desperate to become a wireless broadband player, Dish ups bid for Clearwire

arstechnica.com
Folks, we’re in a good old-fashioned bidding war! Dish has now upped its own bid for Clearwire to $4.40 per share, $1.00 per share more than Sprint’s current offer of $3.40 per share—and noticeably higher than Dish’s own previous offer of $3.30. Both companies are after Clearwire’s significant spectrum...
Desperate to become a wireless broadband player, Dish ups bid for Clearwire

Australia arrests and charges self-proclaimed LulzSec leader "Aush0k"

arstechnica.com
On Wednesday, the Australian Federal Police (AFP) arrested and charged a 24-year-old man from New South Wales who claims to be the leader of LulzSec. The man, who has not yet been named publicly by the authorities, is believed to be the person behind the online moniker “Aush0k.” Other Australian media have...
Australia arrests and charges self-proclaimed LulzSec leader "Aush0k"

VMware's Amazon-style compute cloud will live in four US data centers

arstechnica.com
Virtual reality is sorta like virtualization, right? Plus, this picture has clouds. No, we couldn't come up with a better image for virtualization and cloud computing. Sorry about that. Ruslan Rugoals VMware today unveiled its first public infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) cloud product, putting the virtualization software vendor into direct competition with...
VMware's Amazon-style compute cloud will live in four US data centers
Tonight: Get the clearest, brightest view of Saturn in years
I was struck by lightning yesterday--and boy am I sore
Apple issues OS X 10.8.4 update, includes iMessage and FaceTime fixes

Syria drops offline, again

arstechnica.com
At about 2:45 Eastern time (18:45 UTC), Internet traffic in and out of Syria came to a sudden stop, as routers stopped propagating routes to the country's block of Internet Protocol addresses. The suddenness and completeness of the disconnection is indicative of another government-directed shutdown—the first since a two-day...
Syria drops offline, again
Court shreds power of Motorola's standard-based patents
Microsoft posts record third quarter revenue in spite of flat Windows numbers

Attackers sign malware using crypto certificate stolen from Opera Software

arstechnica.com
Alan Cleaver Hackers penetrated network servers belonging to Opera Software, stole at least one digital certificate, and then used it to distribute malware that incorrectly appeared to be published by the browser maker. The attack was uncovered, halted, and contained on June 19, according to a short advisory that Opera...
Attackers sign malware using crypto certificate stolen from Opera Software
Recursion or while loops: Which is better?
Mozilla delays turning on third-party cookie killer in Firefox
"Look, you may hate me": 90 minutes with John Steele, porn troll

Provo doesn't know where its fiber is, Google makes city spend $500,000 to find it

arstechnica.com
On Tuesday, the Provo city council formally approved the transfer of its iProvo fiber network to Google, making the city the third metro area to gain that sweet, sweet gigabit service. Google is only paying $1 for the network, but in return it will have to provide a “basic...
Provo doesn't know where its fiber is, Google makes city spend $500,000 to find it
iOS default despair: Where Ars staff turns for better app experiences

Tor Books says cutting DRM out of its e-books hasn't hurt business

arstechnica.com
Early this week, Tor Books, a subsidiary of Tom Doherty Associates and the world's leading publisher of science fiction, gave an update on how its decision to do away with Digital Rights Management (DRM) schemes has impacted the company. Long story short: it hasn't, really. Tor announced last April...
Tor Books says cutting DRM out of its e-books hasn't hurt business

Apple changes its mind on iOS VPN changes following VirnetX verdict

arstechnica.com
Apple has walked back its decision to make changes to how iOS devices handle VPN following a $368.2 patent verdict in favor of VirnetX. Apple originally posted a support document to its website earlier this month detailing how the settings would change when iOS users connect to VPN networks,...
Apple changes its mind on iOS VPN changes following VirnetX verdict

More than 20,000 people apply for one-way ticket to Mars

arstechnica.com
Last week we mentioned Mars One, the combination space mission/reality TV show project that aims to send four lucky space travelers to the Red Planet... forever. Interest in the project had been quite high, with the company's latest press release noting that it had received "10,000 messages from prospective...
More than 20,000 people apply for one-way ticket to Mars

Newsreader app Circa hires Reuters Social Media Editor Anthony De Rosa as its new Editor in Chief

thenextweb.com
News consumption service Circa announced today that it has hired Anthony De Rosa, currently Social Media Editor for Reuters, as its new Editor in Chief. De Rosa is expected to join the company in June and will help the existing editorial team “push the boundaries” of the content being showcased...
Newsreader app Circa hires Reuters Social Media Editor Anthony De Rosa as its new Editor in Chief

HTML5 Epic Citadel demo shows the power of OpenGL in the browser

arstechnica.com
Epic Games has released a new version of its popular Epic Citadel tech demo that runs entirely using open HTML5 and JavaScript standards in order to show off the potential for plugin-free game development inside a Web browser. To convert the Unreal Engine 3 tech demo to standards-compliant HTML5,...
HTML5 Epic Citadel demo shows the power of OpenGL in the browser
Hands-on: Batman: Arkham Origins puts detective back in Detective Comics
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