sewers

sewers

How Indiana's Severs are the Next Internet of Things Beachhead

www.readwriteweb.com
An unlikely place to look for the latest trend for the Internet of Things is inside the sewers of the City of South Bend, Indiana. For the past six years, their city managers have been working with a group of consultants from IBM, nearby Notre Dame University and others...
How Indiana's Severs are the Next Internet of Things Beachhead

Indiana's Sewers: An Outpost on the Internet of Things

www.readwriteweb.com
An unlikely place to look for the latest trend for the Internet of Things is inside the sewers of the City of South Bend, Indiana. For the past six years, South Bend's city managers have been working with a group of consultants from IBM, nearby Notre Dame University and others...
Indiana's Sewers: An Outpost on the Internet of Things

Deadlight - preview

www.guardian.co.uk
First Blood meets The Walking Dead in this intriguingly grim zombie platformerThe world is over, pretty much. It's 1986 and some sort of cataclysmic infection has wiped out most of North America. Now an everyman survivor must reach a safe house in a bleak, crumbling Seattle as zombie-like victims emerge...
Deadlight - preview

New Super Bowl XLVI security gadgets: X-Rays, sewer caps and more

thenextweb.com
While Brady and Manning are tossing the pigskin inside Lucas Oil Stadium, the 44 surrounding blocks will be crawling with all kinds of new futuristic tech to make sure the fireworks, tackles, long bombs and fumbles are just inside the stadium. This year’s Super Bowl is special, and its not...
New Super Bowl XLVI security gadgets: X-Rays, sewer caps and more

Odd items in Scotland's sewers

www.boingboing.net
Sottish Water, manager of the country's sewer systems, apparently spends £6 million a year rooting out clogged pipes, which are sometimes plugged up with curious things that were flushed or fell into storm drains: toy soldiers, a Mexican desert king snake, a cow, etc. From STV.TV: A goldfish now named...
Odd items in Scotland's sewers

Letters: Sunday Dialogue: A New School Schedule?

www.nytimes.com
Readers react to a proposal for a longer school year and day.    ...
Letters: Sunday Dialogue: A New School Schedule?

Data, Transparency, and Regulation

www.avc.com
Last month, I pointed to a talk that Nick Grossman gave at Princeton where he laid out the principals of Regulation 2.0. This slide is from that talk. Regulation 2.0 is a framework that we have been working on with a bunch of others who are rethinking what government means...
Data, Transparency, and Regulation

Today's Scuttlebot: Talent Agency for Coders, and Sewer Bots

bits.blogs.nytimes.com
The technology reporters and editors of The New York Times scour the Web for important and peculiar items. For Thursday, selections include Foursquare's plans to expand its ad sales and search, robots that live in the sewers and one of the first agents for software developers....
Today's Scuttlebot: Talent Agency for Coders, and Sewer Bots

Remember Me - review

www.guardian.co.uk
PC, PS3, Xbox; Capcom; £29-£39Reading this on mobile? Click here to viewIn 2084, 99% of the population upload their memories to be shared with others over a network controlled by the evil mega-corp Memorize. You're an "errorist", one of the refusenik 1%, but with the unique ability to reach in...
Remember Me - review

Sina Weibo, China's Twitter, comes to rescue amid flooding in Beijing

thenextweb.com
When torrential rains resulted in widespread flooding in Beijing this past weekend, it was a relatively new technology, micro-blogging, that helped mitigate the damage from the failure of an ancient, sometimes under-appreciated, tech – sewers. The rain was unrelenting in China’s capital on Saturday, with the government declaring it the...
Sina Weibo, China's Twitter, comes to rescue amid flooding in Beijing
Charity trades rats for cellphones in South African township

Listen to the BBC radio adaptation of Neil Gaiman's subterranean fantasy, 'Neverwhere'

www.theverge.com
17 years after its original broadcast, the BBC is bringing its Neverwhere fantasy TV series to the radio. The Sandman and Coraline author Neil Gaiman’s story of a parallel world beneath London’s streets and sewers is voiced by James McAvoy (X-Men: First Class) and Natalie Dormer (Game of Thrones),...
Listen to the BBC radio adaptation of Neil Gaiman's subterranean fantasy, 'Neverwhere'
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